When water is not your friend

Automatic shut-off systems can help prevent costly damage or frustrating cleanup.

Automatic shut-off systems
can prevent costly damage.

Refrigerators, water heaters, dishwashers, washing machines and toilets can be sources of leaks that can cause significant damage if not detected early.

A burst pipe with as little as a one-eighth-inch crack can release 250 gallons of water a day, according to the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety.

The most effective way to prevent costly water damage in your home is to install a leak detection and water shut-off system. There are several levels of protection that can meet the needs and budgets of all homeowners: Read More

First aid for frozen pipes – steps to prevent more problems

Take steps to prevent frozen and burst pipes.

Take steps to prevent frozen and burst pipes.

With winter not even a month old, there’s plenty of cold weather ahead of us – enough to freeze pipes, causing costly water damage at your home or business.

If you suspect you have a frozen pipe – you’ve turned on the faucet, but no water comes out – call a qualified plumber immediately. Shut off the main water valve, and leave the faucets open until repairs are made.
Read More

Let it flow, let it flow, let it flow…

prevent-freezing-pipes

Allowing faucets to drip
can prevent pipes from freezing.

Did you know that letting your most weather-susceptible faucets drip during periods of extreme cold can keep your water pipes from freezing? Don’t let cold weather ice your pipes this winter!

Because liquid expands as it freezes, pipes full of water are vulnerable, and those outdoors or running against exterior walls are especially susceptible. With a few preventive steps, you can save the expense and bother of burst pipes and water damage:
Read More

Stay alert for vehicles damaged by Hurricane Sandy

flooded-car

Know a used car’s history before you buy.

The counts vary, but it has been estimated 225,000 to 300,000 vehicles sustained flood damage as a result of Hurricane Sandy. What happened to those vehicles? In some case, unscrupulous opportunists bought them for pennies on the dollar. The vehicles were dried out, shined up and offered for resale for hundreds — sometimes thousands — less than the fair market value. Good deal? Maybe, if you don’t mind the vehicle’s mechanical, electrical or safety systems potentially (more like probably) failing at any time. Read More