When water is not your friend

Automatic shut-off systems can help prevent costly damage or frustrating cleanup.

Automatic shut-off systems
can prevent costly damage.

Refrigerators, water heaters, dishwashers, washing machines and toilets can be sources of leaks that can cause significant damage if not detected early.

A burst pipe with as little as a one-eighth-inch crack can release 250 gallons of water a day, according to the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety.

The most effective way to prevent costly water damage in your home is to install a leak detection and water shut-off system. There are several levels of protection that can meet the needs and budgets of all homeowners: Read More

Texting and driving a growing concern

cell-stop-signAt any given daylight moment across America, approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, according to a survey from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. That number has held steady since 2010.

Meanwhile, a University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute study showed that a quarter of teens respond to text messages once or more every time they drive. Twenty percent of teens and 10 percent of parents admit that they have extended, multi-message text conversations while driving. Read More

When deer are in your headlights

deer-crossing-road

Deer collisions increase in fall and early winter.

As the outdoor temperature gradually drops, deer activity and deer-vehicle accidents increase. Every year across the country, deer-vehicle accidents account for billions of dollars in vehicle damage, thousands of injuries and hundreds of fatalities. These tips can help you avoid a collision with a deer and stay safe while on the road.
Read More

Carbon monoxide: Combustion’s deadly companion

This is the fourth of five blogs on fire safety topics during our October observance of Fire Prevention Month.

carbon-monoxide-alarm

A carbon monoxide alarm may or may not
have a digital readout.

Burning wood in a fireplace. Heating a home with a gas furnace. Cooking on a gas stovetop. Grilling with charcoal. Running a combustion engine such as an automobile or generator. Drying clothes in a gas dryer. Many of us enjoy these modern conveniences, but what is the danger they all have in common? Carbon monoxide.

In 2010, U.S. fire departments responded to more than 80,000 non-fire carbon monoxide incidents. In 2008 alone nearly 200 people died from carbon monoxide poisoning.
Read More