Technology improves efficiency, driving habits

driving-technology-telematics

Everyone has driven down the highway and has seen that sign on the back of a vehicle that reads, “How’s my driving? Call (a toll-free number)” Those signs have been a part of the driving landscape for many years and are still in use today as part of the burgeoning industry that gathers vehicle use information. The term used today for electronically gathering and reporting vehicle use information is “vehicle telematics.”


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Position yourself for workstation comfort

Millions of workers spend their days in front of a computer screen. To stay comfortable and prevent strain or injury, make sure your chair, desk and screen are arranged to fit your needs. Read our infographic for suggestions to help you stay comfortable and productive.


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Reducing liquor liability before the first drop is poured

Failing to act responsibly when serving alcohol could be catastrophic for your business. You could be held accountable for any death, injury or damages caused by an intoxicated patron, resulting in expensive civil or criminal litigation, fines, increased insurance rates, loss of your liquor license – even the loss of your business. Safeguards can reduce the risk.


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Focus Four construction-related hazards: Caught in

Part 4 of 4 Construction is among the most dangerous industries in the country. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for 2014 showed 885 fatal on-the-job injuries, more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. that year. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) calls the leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites its Focus Four: falls, electrocution, struck by and caught in or between. These four leading hazards are responsible for 71 percent of deaths and[…..]


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Focus Four construction-related hazards: Struck by

Part 3 of 4 Construction is among the most dangerous industries in the country. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for 2014 showed 885 fatal on-the-job injuries, more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. that year. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) calls the leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites its Focus Four: falls, electrocution, struck by object and caught in or between. These four leading hazards are responsible for 71 percent of deaths[…..]


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