Employers prepare for new OSHA reporting rule

paramedics-with-patient-on-gurney

Beginning January 1, 2015, employers will have new requirements for reporting workplace fatalities and serious injuries to the federal government. A new Occupational Safety and Health Administration rule also revises how records are kept and updates the list of employers partially exempt from recordkeeping requirements. Even an employer partially exempt from recordkeeping must still adhere to the new reporting requirements.


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Child car seats: Precious cargo packaging

car-seat-checks

The proper use of child car seats can reduce the risk of fatal injuries to infants by 71 percent and to toddlers by 54 percent! As car crashes are a leading cause of death among children ages 1-13, the use of car seats is critical when children are in your car. Unfortunately, a recent National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study found that three out of four children are not adequately protected because they are either in the wrong seat for their age and weight or their seat is improperly installed.


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As temps go up, motorcycles come out

motorcycle-safety

Motorcycles made up just 3 percent of all registered vehicles in the United States in 2011, but motorcyclists were 30 times more likely than private passenger occupants to die in a motor vehicle crash and five times more likely to be injured, according to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The agency observes Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in May and offers safety tips for motorcyclists and drivers.


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Texting and driving a growing concern

cell-stop-sign

At any given daylight moment across America, approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, according to a survey from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. That number has held steady since 2010. Meanwhile, a University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute study showed that a quarter of teens respond to text messages once or more every time they drive. Twenty percent of teens and 10 percent of parents admit that they have extended, multi-message text conversations while driving.


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