Focus Four construction-related hazards: Falls

Part 1 of 4 Construction is among the most dangerous industries in the country. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for 2014 showed 885 fatal on-the-job injuries, more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. that year. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) calls the leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites its Focus Four: falls, electrocution, struck by and caught in or between. These four leading hazards are responsible for 71 percent of deaths and[…..]


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Insurers help employers make workplaces safer, avoid potential fines

Employers can protect their workers and avoid costly fines by implementing workplace safety programs, and their insurers may be able to help. Insurance company loss control consultants can help implement safety programs, provide training and connect employers with resources to make their workplaces safer. Now is a good time to request this support, as employers who violate workplace safety regulations will find that fines are about to get a lot more costly.


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Preventing falls on the construction site

Falls are the top cause of construction fatalities and account for one-third of on-the-job injury deaths in the industry. Each year in the United States, more than 200 construction workers are killed and more than 10,000 are seriously injured by falls. Preventing falls and protecting workers starts at the top, according to this construction company owner. More information is available at the Stop Construction Falls website.


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Know the limitations when using a crane

The world of construction is fast paced. Contractors strive to complete their projects quickly and efficiently without sacrificing quality or safety. Mobile cranes are versatile and powerful pieces of equipment that can help contractors reach those goals by moving materials and equipment great distances and placing them in hard-to-reach areas. Whether a contracting firm owns or rents a crane or has a crane present on its jobsite, no lift should be treated as routine. There is always potential for death, injury, property damage, interruption of business and the effects of[…..]


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Hiring a commercial contractor? Don’t overlook risk

If you are growing a business, developing real estate or buying commercial construction services, you probably know “construction” equals “risk.” The safety of the tradespeople working on your property and the potential for physical damage resulting from construction activity all factor into your planning and risk management. But one important and often overlooked risk is who you hire to do the work.


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