Troy Dohmeyer

Profile:
Construction Technical Specialist for the Loss Control department at Cincinnati Insurance, Troy Dohmeyer is responsible for all construction loss control issues, including developing company guidelines, overseeing quality and providing input on risk selection, conducting training and serving on corporate oversight committees. Troy provides direct support to loss control consultants, underwriters and agents and participates in the Contractor Liability Workshop for Agents. Troy holds a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and Biochemistry and is currently pursuing his Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designation.


Prepare your building to weather the cold

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Temperature extremes from summer to winter place a heavy burden on the buildings we live in and the places we work. With little warning, gusting winds, heavy snow and bitter temperatures can create a weather event that could collapse your roof, freeze and rupture your piping and cause havoc in your life.


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Fire danger in the construction zone

danger-work

Fires are a significant hazard on construction sites. According to the National Fire Protection Association, there were an annual average of 830 fires in residential buildings under construction from 2007 through 2011, excluding one- and two-family homes. These fires caused an average of $56 million in direct property damage per year. Over those same years, there were an estimated 400 fires annually in large residential buildings undergoing major renovation, causing an average of $17 million in direct property loss per year.


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Focus Four construction-related hazards: Caught in

ConFatalityCaughtIn_Thumb

Part 4 of 4 Construction is among the most dangerous industries in the country. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for 2014 showed 885 fatal on-the-job injuries, more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. that year. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) calls the leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites its Focus Four: falls, electrocution, struck by and caught in or between. These four leading hazards are responsible for 71 percent of deaths and[…..]


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Focus Four construction-related hazards: Struck by

ConFatalityStruckBy_Thumb

Part 3 of 4 Construction is among the most dangerous industries in the country. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data for 2014 showed 885 fatal on-the-job injuries, more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. that year. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) calls the leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites its Focus Four: falls, electrocution, struck by object and caught in or between. These four leading hazards are responsible for 71 percent of deaths[…..]


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